Russell and Duenes

Public Schools Are Exceptional at What They Aim To Do

with one comment

Americans often lament what they consider to be the “failure of public schools.” But such an assessment assumes that the primary goal of public schools is to truly educate children. This is a rather dubious assumption. Government schools clearly have some other aims. What might those be? A reading of National Education Association (NEA) material tells us.

“A-13. Financial Support of Public Education. Funds must be provided for programs to alleviate race, gender, and sexual orientation discrimination and to eliminate portrayal of race, gender, and sexual orientation stereotypes in the public schools.”

“B-9. Racism, Sexism, and Sexual Orientation Discrimination. Discrimination and stereotyping based on such factors as race, gender, immigration status, disability, ethnicity, occupation, and sexual orientation must be eliminated. Plans, activities, and programs must… increase respect, understanding, acceptance, and sensitivity toward gays, lesbians, bisexuals, transgendered people.”

“B-1. Early Childhood Education. The National Education Association supports early childhood education programs in the public schools for children from birth through age eight.”

“I-12. Family Planning. The National Education Association supports family planning, including the right to reproductive freedom. The Association also urges the implementation of community-operated, school-based family planning clinics that will provide intensive counseling by trained personnel.” (For all of the above NEA material, HT: Douglas Wilson, The Case for Classical Christian Education [Wheaton: Crossway, 2003], 25-26).

Public schools have done quite well at implementing these objectives. Thus, what should be obvious is that public schools fail to educate and fail to honor Christ because this is not the primary objective. This is something that needs to be repeated and shouted from the housetops again and again. As Douglas Wilson rightly concludes, “Education is fundamentally religious. Consequently, there is no question about whether a morality will be imposed in that education, but rather which morality will be imposed. Christians and assorted traditionalists who want a secular school system to instill anything other than secular ethics are wanting something that has never happened and can never happen.” (ibid., 26)

-D

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Written by Michael Duenes

August 14, 2010 at 2:19 pm

Posted in Duenes, Education

One Response

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  1. Excellent post, every word.

    “Education is fundamentally religious. Consequently, there is no question about whether a morality will be imposed in that education, but rather which morality will be imposed. Christians and assorted traditionalists who want a secular school system to instill anything other than secular ethics are wanting something that has never happened and can never happen.”

    Yes, exactly, and this is one reason why the “separation of church and state” – a misunderstood concept if ever there was one – is currently badly misapplied when it comes to education. “We can’t have public schools teaching religion with taxpayers’ money!” is a flawed argument from the get-go because there is no such thing as a neutral, non-religious worldview. The only question is which religious worldview gets taught.

    That’s why, while I may be dreaming in technicolour, I’d like to see taxpaying parents be allowed to opt out of taxes that go towards public schools if their child simultaneously attends a private or home school.

    Samson

    August 14, 2010 at 5:51 pm


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