Russell and Duenes

Gray’s Anatomy

with one comment

Would you go to a doctor who had simply mastered the contents of Gray’s Anatomy and then went immediately into medical practice? To ask the question is to answer it. Of course we want our doctors and lawyers and airline pilots to keep learning, keep training, keep reviewing, keep mastering their craft. Do we expect the same from teachers?

What do we expect, say, a high school economics teacher to know over time? Should she have to read The Wealth of Nations and master its contents? How about Hayek’s The Road to Serfdom or Keynes’ The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money or Friedman’s Free to Choose? Should he have a thorough understanding of how the stock market, the FED and monetary policy work? Should she have to have command of socialist vs. capitalist economic theories and history? By what standards should we judge and measure what the qualifications are?

-D

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Written by Michael Duenes

October 11, 2010 at 6:30 am

Posted in Duenes, Education

One Response

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  1. Not everyone can teach. Even if you have mastered the material and have all the qualifications in the world, that doesn’t mean you can teach. The ability to communicate to students is a gift, and not everyone has it.

    But currently, everyone is allowed to teach (if you include private schools, homeschooling, etc). I prefer it as is. It’s up to me, the parent, to decide what qualifications I want in a teacher for my child.

    Personally, I’m more impressed with a B.S. in economics from the University of Chicago than a PHD in the economics of social justice from Berkeley (not sure if that’s a degree, but you get my point). But that’s just me. Others may not agree, and I don’t want them making choices for me.

    Some kids will get screwed up because bad parents can’t tell the difference. But I’d much rather have the freedom to choose, and let the good teachers rise to the top.

    Bates

    October 12, 2010 at 1:00 pm


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