Russell and Duenes

The Small-Scale Miracles Should Point Us to the Large-Scale One

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I simply can’t say enough about C.S. Lewis’ chapter on Miracles in God in the Dock. This chapter by itself is worth the price of the book. Lewis expounds on the reasons why we humans don’t see the miracle that is God’s work each day in creation, and as such, part of Jesus’ work in coming was to open our eyes not only to the miracles he performed in an instant, but to the miracle that God performs every day. He writes,

There is an activity of God displayed throughout creation, a wholesale activity let us say, which men refuse to recognize. The miracles done by God incarnate, living as a man in Palestine, perform the very same things as this wholesale activity, but at a different speed and on a smaller scale. One of their chief purposes is that men, having seen a thing done by personal power on the small scale, may recognize, when they see the same thing done on a large scale, that the power behind it is also personal – is indeed the very same person who lived among us two thousand years ago…God creates the vine and teaches it to draw up water by its roots and, with the aid of the sun, to turn that water into a juice which will ferment and take on certain qualities. Thus every year, from Noah’s time till ours, God turns water into wine. That, men fail to see. Either like the Pagans they refer the process to some finite spirit, Bacchus or Dionysus: or else, like the moderns, they attribute real and ultimate causality to the chemical and other material phenomena which are all that our senses can discover in it. But when Christ at Cana makes water into wine, the mask is off. The miracle has only half its effect if it only convinces us that Christ is God: it will have its full effect if whenever we see a vineyard or drink a glass of wine we remember that here works He who sat at the wedding party in Cana. (emphasis mine)

-D

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Written by Michael Duenes

September 9, 2011 at 10:40 am

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