Russell and Duenes

Those Who Educate Get to Frame the Questions

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Mark Steyn writes:

The short version of electoral cycles is as follows: The low-turnout midterms are fought in political terms, and thus Republicans do well and sometimes spectacularly well (1994, 2010); the higher-turnout presidential elections are fought in broader cultural terms, and Republicans do poorly, because they’ve ceded most of the cultural space to the other side. What’s more likely to determine the course of your nation’s destiny? A narrow focus on robocalls in selected Florida and New Hampshire counties every other fall? Or determining how all the great questions are framed from the classroom to the iPod to the movie screen in the 729 days between elections? (emphasis mine)

I don’t quote this for any real political purpose, but for a spiritual and educational one. The “questions are framed” the way they are – by both parties, mind you – because our lamed and secularly doctrinaire public school system has taught us to frame the questions this way. “Conservative” Christians, at least the ones who show up as political candidates, really don’t know how to frame the questions, nor do they know how to answer the badly framed ones. I couldn’t care less about the success of the Republican party, but I care a great deal about the honor of Jesus and the success of the gospel in the public square. I believe we Christians have, as one pundit put it, the task of persuasion, empowered by the Holy Spirit. But it’s hard to persuade people of the truth when the right questions don’t get asked. And they’re not going to get asked so long as Christians disbelieve the fact that “in Christ are hidden all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge,” and therefore, don’t educate their children with this as the banner over the entire curriculum. I’m simply not willing to hand my sons over, day after day, year after year, to teachers who, by law, frame every question as though Jesus isn’t Lord.

-D

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Written by Michael Duenes

November 9, 2012 at 8:56 pm

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